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Salamaq, the first large agricultural and livestock fair to resume activity after the pandemic

The Salamaq Fair, at the Salamanca Fairgrounds, has been “the first major agricultural and livestock fair” to open its doors in person in Spain since the coronavirus pandemic began. The minister of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Luis Planas, who participated in the inauguration, attended the inauguration.

The president of the Board, Alfonso Fernández Mañueco, has highlighted the “strength” of agriculture and livestock in Castilla y León, with a product that “is based on quality” and, as an example, has highlighted that the Community is ” leader “in different livestock productions such as beef, sheep’s milk or Iberian pigs.

The president of the Board, Alfonso Fernández Mañueco, has highlighted the “strength” of agriculture and livestock in Castilla y León

Minister Planas has highlighted the work of the fair that shows in its different spaces “the strength of the sector” that, after the pandemic, has data that “allows us to see the future with greater optimism” and that is working on its adaptation to “recover and adapt to new circumstances and opportunities.”

The Salamanca fair has opened its doors from September 3 to 7 at the fairgrounds to show itself as “the best and most complete showcase of the agricultural sector in Spain”, with 434 exhibitors and a total of 1,580 head of cattle in its cattle exhibition pure.

 

 

The Deputy for Agriculture and Livestock, Julián Barrera, highlighted the fight to combat “hoaxes related to climate change and the carbon footprint for which they make meat consumption responsible.” “In the balance is virtue and everything in excess is bad, but blaming climate change on farmers who work for animal welfare and fight every day does not make any sense,” remarked the deputy for whom the professionalism of farmers it is “worthy of applause.” Finally, Barrera recalled that the transition from the consumption of vegetables to that of meat “led to the human being today being who he is thanks to meat protein.”

Finally, Barrera recalled that the transition from the consumption of vegetables to that of meat “led to the human being today being who he is thanks to meat protein.”